insane. Fritzl case again

I did not want to write about it again, but after reading this article quoting the interview of Josef Fritzl with his lawyer, published as an attempt to somehow justify man’s actions, I must say, that Mr. Josef’s explanations are quite lame.

Blaming his childhood upbringing in a Nazi society and his mother’s strong personality for his tendencies to be extraordinarily firm and demanding… Blaming his daughter, Elisabeth, for paving the road to her imprisonment by herself, by associating with the wrong crowd, drinking and smoking… Blaming her for being too independent, getting out of his control… Blaming his mind entering into the “vicious cycle, where there is no way out”. Blaming his lack of control in regards to raping his daughter often and regularly…

His attempts to gain any bits of sympathy from us, who labeled him as a monster, are endless. His confession of a desire to release the prisoners, stories about bringing them flowers, presents and Christmas trees, his story times about the life “outside”, even about his wife Rosemarie being sad not having a contact with her daughter; his care for his daughter well being while pregnant as a result of constant rapes, by allowing her to get educated in the subject of prenatal care and birth and by providing her the necessities to survive this whole time; saying touchy words about building a “new family”, bonding times with them, about providing a washing machine and other luxurious equipment… it’s all sickening. It’s nothing else but keeping control over his slaves, delivering to them bare survival kit day by day, year by year. It’s nithing else but shameless admittance of his conscious and focused, deliberate exploitation of others in order to feed his demonic rage, perversion and desires.

He dismisses some parts of Elisabeth’s testimony. But guess what, no matter what she says, the whole world will believe her. It’s her time to speak up, her time to decide, her time to explain, her time to be number one. It’s also her time to forgive.

We’ve heard enough from Mr. Fritzl. We are ready to hear from the hero herself.

This whole mumbling of his convinces me even more in a fact, that he knew exactly what he was doing, what were the consequences of such a behavior, and with that in mind he continued in his depravity. He wanted this life of 8,516 days of torture to continue.

If the Austrian court will decide that this explanation qualifies as a valid testimony of a person who can’t be judged because of his incompatibility with the ‘main stream society’ morals, then let’s examine the other millions who grew up in the same political, cultural and family circumstances. Let’s see how many Josefs we can find.

If the Austrian court will decide he is insane, they are insane and we live in an insane world.

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horror in Austria. update 2. Elizabeth and Josef Fritzl

Part 1

Part 2

There was a press conference. More facts were revealed about Josef Fritzl. The cellar which he kept his daughter and her children in for years, was built by himself during 6 years period prior to imprisoning Elizabeth. That’s the time he started to rape Elizabeth regularly. He liked it so much and he wanted it to continue for his whole life. Building the dungeon was a way for this heinous crime to be continued. He forced his daughter to help him built the room inside. The cellar had 8 doors, the last two electronically monitored.

For the first 2 days of her captivity Elizabeth was handcuffed to a pole, for the next 9 months, she was kept on a leash, which allowed her only to use the toilet. He raped her about every three days. For the first 9 years Elizabeth and her 3 children were kept in one room, 35m2 (380 square feet), originally designed to be a nuclear shelter. After the 4th child was born, he added 20m2. That suggests that the children were present in the room when he was raping his own daughter year after year. There were also punishment cells in the cellar, with nothing else but bare walls.

He installed a goldfish tank for them to enjoy and he was giving them supplements of vitamin D.

The psychiatric clinic where the family is kept for now.

In the hospital: the family is reuniting daily for meals and play. They are slowly being exposed to the sunlight. Their skin is very pale. Both boys, who spend all their life in the dungeon learned everything they know from their mother or from the TV. They use a mixture of words and communicate with noises that are a mixture of growling and cooing. 5 year old Felix prefers to crawl, although can walk upright. Elisabeth thought them to read and write, but lost a lot of her knowledge. Elisabeth looks as old as her mother.

Josef. He is in prison. He is obsessed with following all the news regarding his case. His lawyer will present the case of mental illness and/or insanity. His fellow prisoners are threatening to kill him. He is in a single cell, with a window, and, his lawyer says: “He is a broken man”.

19 year old Kirsten is still in coma. She has never been seen by the doctor or a dentist before. She has lost almost all her teeth.

From the news coverage on May 7th we hear Josef denying him being a monster, being cooperative with the prosecutors and saying, that “if not for him, they all would die”.

How long will it take for these victims to even emerge as dignified human beings? Will they be able to forgive? Will they be able to enter into “normal” society and every day life? How strong is Elizabeth that she can even enjoy life as it is now? What will Josef’s wife do? How are the children going to relate to each other in the future? I have many questions…

22 weeks. the movie in the making

Forerunner Films has been making a documentary about this story ( a woman having a baby in the bathroom of an abortion clinic, trying to save the baby after initially wanting to kill it). They started 3 days ago and they should be finished tomorrow night.

It started with a vision which a guy called Ángel Manuel Soto had carried for some time. Ángel is an intercessory missionary at IHOP-KC and a freelance videographer. He also attends The Call Institute (TCI) directed by Lou Engle.

He shared this story with theCall class. Lou Engle and others started to pray for the vision to become reality in the making. This vision became Angel’s obsession (some people would use the more appropriate word CALLING). People prayed. In the natural it seemed impossible. No equipment, no money. People prayed. After one of the meetings one girl approached him and offered an amount which was like an injection of faith to look forward to this project.

Then the story goes wild. Through some miraculous intervention, He gets an invitation to chat with the director of Bella movie. People prayed. He flies to Hollywood, spends some time with Alejandro Monteverde, director of Bella. He promises some help. People are praying really seriously now.

That’s how what was impossible a month ago, is happening right now. Cinematographer, a friend of Alejandro, flew in, and some of IHOP-KC’s Media crew (including my American husband) have been engaging in everything. With the budget they have, they had only 4 days for shooting (this will be the cheapest made documentary ever). They are busy, exhausted, overtired (yesterday they were shooting till 3 am) and overworked. But it’s all for His glory.

22 weeks on MySpace22 weeks on Facebook22 weeks Website

22 weeks. the story

A woman who was scheduled to have her 22-week-along pregnancy ended at a Florida abortion clinic instead delivered the baby alive in a restroom and says her pleading for help from medical staff went unheeded, even when an employee saw that the tiny boy was moving.

The mother, Angele, who asked that her last name not be used, is now considering legal action against the facility. She is being represented by Liberty Counsel, a nonprofit pro-life and religious-liberty legal organization.

“I counseled with a pretty and petite younger black woman who has a small son,” Angele wrote of her first visit. “Her name began with an L. I do not remember her full name. She explained the process of laminaria insertion. I asked her other questions such as, will they inject saline or urea into the amniotic sac? I was concerned that it would hurt the baby as it generally (from what I’ve read) burns the skin and lungs. I expressed my concerns that he not suffer or feel anything.”

The purpose of inserting laminaria is to dilate the cervix overnight in preparation for the abortion. Angele explained she chose the “labor and delivery process” for her abortion “as opposed to partial birth or having to dismember the child to retrieve him from the uterus/birth canal.”

Angele, who is in her 30s, says she was given Valium “to relax me for the laminaria insertion.”

“The injection burned a lot as it went in. … The discomfort was distracting. I still felt the ‘lams’ as they were being inserted. Dr. Perper told me to relax my muscles and noted that my cervix was slightly soft. I asked him what that meant and he said it was good.”

Digoxin is a drug injected into an unborn baby to cause his or her heart to stop in preparation for what amounts to a stillborn birth. Angele says despite having asked for it, she did not receive the digoxin injection, which she surmises caused the baby to be born alive.

Referring to the digoxin injection, Angele told WND:

“They didn’t do it.”

She says she overheard staff talking about “dig-ing” her – injecting the digoxin – but, after taking a sonogram initially and then quickly taking the machine to another room, the staff, she says, failed to return it to her room. A sonogram machine is used to guide the needle into the unborn baby’s heart.

“I wanted it to be as humane and painless as possible for my son,” she said, choking back tears. “They told me they would guide a needle directly into his heart and it would put him to sleep, and he wouldn’t feel anything.”

“My friend and I took a taxi back to our hotel. We rested up a bit, changed and walked to a nearby restaurant for dinner. That night, all night off and on I could feel the baby still moving. I told my friend this worried me. I remember thinking it must take time to slow down and stop his heart. I was still a little ‘out of it’ from the medicine and just figured I must have been mistaken about how the digoxin was supposed to work. He was still moving when I went to sleep. I was concerned and started to call the after-hours line, but again second-guessed myself.”

“I waited outside, cramping and crying, for the clinic to open,” Angele explained. “My contractions were close. I had been having them for hours. I knocked repeatedly at the door. There was a burgundy truck in the parking lot. Ten to 15 minutes later, Debbie opened the door and let me in.

“I was directed to ‘the room.’ I had been there for a moment the day before and thought it to be a waiting room for family or driving companions. It had a leather sofa and a fabric sofa, both with a white blanket stretched across the seat cushions, a small television and a few magazines.”

However, noted Angele,

“It was not a waiting area – it was the ‘delivery room.’ It was, of course, very cold.”

“My contractions became stronger and more frequent very rapidly. I called for [staff member] Violene, thinking it was time to be moved into another room and wanting to know if I could have anything for pain. She said that medication would stop the contractions and for me to stay right there and again, she would be back. I told her it was almost time; I could just tell, and she told me I was not at all ready. She left. I began to bleed.”

After going to the bathroom, Angele says, “I came back to the sofa, (they both really smelled awful), wrapped up in the wet and sour-smelling blanket, then decided it was better without it. I rocked back and forth on my hands and knees, trying to hold the heating pad to my stomach to both relieve the pain and try to stay warm. I was looking down and saw little smears and spots of dried blood on the floor and an old cotton ball with blood on it by the fabric-covered sofa across from me. Noticing how dirty it was and how no one was in the room or even nearby in the hallway began to make me nervous and uncomfortable. I went right back to the powder room and began to try to push a lot. I thought it might help since I was told I was not nearly ready to deliver.”

“In one agonizing push, I felt and heard something come out. Then immediately another push. I was weak. I just held my head in my hands for a moment. Then I decided to stand up. I looked. There was my baby, the whitish cord and what I thought surely must be the placenta.

“I started sobbing and lay down in the floor. I stared and stared at my son. I was horrified that I had just had him in a commode.”

“His right leg moved. He curled up a bit like he was cold; I screamed for Violene! No one came. I managed to get to the doorway, pants down, blood everywhere and yelled again. I went back to my baby. I heard her say she’d be right there.”

“I showed her Rowan, told her he was alive and moving and to call 911! She took a quick look, said he’s not moving now and she’d be back to take care of things while walking out. I called her again. I was touching Rowan softly and he moved again. I called her back. Rowan jumped, I think startled by the loud sound of my calling for help. I showed her that he was moving and alive. I begged her to hurry and call 911, now!”

“She said for me to lie down and she would get her supervisor. No one came.”

“I continued to try to caress and comfort my son by rubbing his back, tummy and chest. I stroked his precious little head and kept telling him I loved him and we would be OK. I was afraid to move him because I did not want to do anything that might end up hurting him. I pushed my pinky into his little hand and his fingers curled around me. Still no one was coming. I was terrified but trying not to let him know I was scared. I kept telling him what a beautiful son he was and that we were going to be safe soon.”

“I left Rowan for two seconds, grabbed the phone, jumped back into the bathroom to be with him, calling my girlfriend ‘Sharon’ at the same time,” she wrote. “I told her Rowan was alive and no one was helping us to please call an ambulance to the clinic immediately and hung up.

“I stayed beside Rowan talking to him, telling him how strong he was being and how proud I was of him. I told him God must really want us to be together for him to make it through everything he had just been through and that Mommy was so sorry but so happy to have a chance to love him. I told him he was a strong little miracle and that I couldn’t wait for him to meet his brother and sister. I just kept touching him, trying to warm him with my hands and talking to him so he would not feel any more afraid than he already must.

“Then Rowan stopped moving.”

“He was perfect, slightly pale and a little translucent. His eyebrows were pale but wide and well-defined. You could see little hairs on his face and head. He had the tiniest little fingernails and toenails. I noticed they already had a little bit of growth. His mouth was lovely. He was this perfectly formed one pound, one ounce human being. He was beautiful. He had been so strong.

“I wrapped him in [a] blue pad instead of one of the wet blankets. I just kept kissing him and telling him I loved him so much. I told him I was sorry I couldn’t get anyone to help us and I was so sorry for ever coming here.”

“Oddly, she came back within two or three minutes,” Angele wrote. “She was more irritated and insistent than before. I was irritated that she was rushing me and that she did not seem to be in such a hurry when Rowan was alive. Where was she when Violene was supposedly going to get her and we needed her help? She asked again to take him. I flatly refused her. I could tell she was angry. I did not care. I told her that I expected her to leave me alone so I could finish praying with Rowan and that we needed privacy.”

“I was staring at my son, crying softly and noticing the dried blood on the walls. I felt so bad. I felt so helpless. I had been so wrong to come here and yet I felt so lucky to have my son born alive. I wanted to fix and change everything once I saw his precious little face and body. All we needed was someone to get us to safety. I felt so awful that the only thing I could do was tell him we were going to be OK and that would be together forever, that we were strong and a good team.

“I wondered if babies went immediately to heaven. Are they immediately given wisdom, perspective and understanding? Could Rowan see that I loved him? Could he see that I wanted him with me and that I tried to help him stay with me? Could he see everything that happened while he was here?”

“The police asked if I would like them to take Rowan to the funeral home,” she wrote. “I told them that I had made previous arrangements for him to be picked up by the funeral director.”

“I know you’re thinking, ‘How can a Christian possible make that decision?’ – but I think it happens a lot more often than you think.”

This whole story and the pictures are taken from this article.

Report on the autopsy of baby Rowan.

Tomorrow next part.

horror in Austria. update

The beginning of this story, where a father kept his daughter, Elizabeth (her picture from years ago below) in a windowless cellar for 24 years and had 7 children with her is here.

The update below is taken from here.

19 year old Kerstin is in a critical state, her predictions to survive are slim.

Josef Fritzl is being connected with 3 other rape cases back in the 60-ties.

The colour blue; birdsong, moving traffic and the rustling of leaves: all that and much more is alarmingly new for two of the Austrian children who have spent their lives locked in an underground bunker.

Bernhard Kepplinger, the supervising doctor for the Fritzl family – the three relatively well-adjusted children who were brought up above ground and the three from the cellar – is more cautious: “Each child will need individual therapy and we should be careful not to overdo it.”

One problem has been separating the two boys from their mother, Elisabeth. “They were probably overprotected by their mother in the cellar,” Dr Friedrich said.

Elisabeth, 42, had to shield them from the sexual abuse of her – and their – father, Josef. When they heard the sounds of their father having sex with their mother they would retreat to one of the bedrooms and watch television to blank out the noise. Now, influenced by so much television, the children’s view of the world is two, rather than three-dimensional.

The youngest boy is given the best chance of recovery because of his relatively short period in the dungeon. He is curious rather than threatened by the outside world. When he was first taken out of the cellar he asked a policeman: “Is that God up there?” pointing at the sky.

The older boy reportedly has problems with balance and co-ordination.

The hospital lifts have been frightening for the boys. When the doors close, they panic: fears of the cellar dungeon are still very fresh.

The younger boy is said to be confused by the ringtones of mobile phones. As for the older one, he has grown to adolescence in the improvised prison created by his father. The television has given him some idea about cars, computers and politicians, but it is all very abstract.

Some things are familiar – the smell of food from the cooking ring – and the psychiatric team is trying to build on the recognized sensations while extending his range.

Never in modern Europe has there been a case of such sustained sensory deprivation. Even Natascha Kampusch, who escaped from her kidnapper 18 months ago, spent part of her captivity upstairs, was allowed occasionally into the garden and was even taken on a trip to the mountains by her abductor. Moreover, she was already 10 years old when she was first kidnapped, already quite articulate, able to read and write and aware that she was a captive. None of the cellar children were told they were prisoners; Elisabeth presented their cellar existence as normal life.

horror in Austria

Think of it what you want. It’s a true story.

Kerstin, 19 year old girl, was brought to the hospital with shortness of breath and cramps. In her purse the medical personnel finds a note from her mother, Elisabeth, who disappeared 24 years earlier (She was believed of joining a religious sect, leaving the message: “Don’t look for me”, and leaving her 3 kids behind).

Unexpectedly Elisabeth comes to see her daughter, accompanied by Elisabeth’s father, Josef Fritzl. Police shows up, questions Elisabeth and finds shocking facts.

Josef Fritzl (73 years old) was imprisoning his own daughter, Elisabeth (42 years old) for the last 24 years, abused her sexually since she was 11, had 7 children with her. One child, a twin, died few days after was born, and the infant’s body was burned by Fritzl in the oven.

Fritzl’s house

Fritzl’s wife, Rosemarie, did not know nothing about this horror, although it was happening in the 60 m2 (645 square feet) cellar located by their house. 3 of the kids lived with Elisabeth, 3 of the kids lived with Josef, their father-grandfather.

Elisabeth and her 3 children, ages: 19, 18 and 5 have not seen light or fresh air for 24 years. They lived in a small bedroom and a bathroom cellar, with a cooking area and TV as the only contact with the outside world.

Elisabeth and her children were taken to a psychiatric clinic. She agreed to reveal the whole story after being assured that she will never see her father again. Kerstin is in a induced coma, in a critical condition, on a respirator.

Josef Fritzl faces 15 to 20 years in prison.

Lydia Gouardo, 45, a survivor in a similar story (was raped and kept by her guardian for 28 years in France and has 6 children) wants to become Elisabeth’s friend.

Natascha Kampusch of Vienna, who was held captive by her kidnapper for more than eight years, since she was 10 years old, said she has donated $38,800 to Elisabeth and her children

Read more in Guardian.UK or on CNN.

Can you belive it ?!?!